Changes in mental health can sometimes alter how we perceive the world.

If you’re noticing unusual things happening to you or having confusing feelings about the world around you, you’re not the only one—these experiences are more common than you might think. The Path Program works with young people at risk of developing or experiencing psychosis. We’re here to support you on your path to feeling like yourself again. 

 


 

Understanding mental health 

Today, nearly half of all teens and 1 in 5 young adults cope with mental health challenges. Your mental health, like your physical health, is constantly changing. It varies from person to person and can change over time.  

When problems are temporary and tolerable, they often just improve with time and support from friends and family.  But when they persist and disrupt your functioning (for example, in school, work, or relationships), treatment by a mental health professional may help to prevent things from getting worse and support a faster recovery.  

 


 

Understanding psychosis as a spectrum 

More common than you might think, “psychosis” is not a specific illness but a word used by mental health professionals to describe a broad range of mental health symptoms. Often these symptoms include changes in our thoughts and perceptions that can make us feel confused or distressed when interacting with the world. These symptoms can come and go and vary in intensity over time, but sometimes they persist or worsen, disrupting day to day activities like studying, working, or socializing.  

Learn more about pscyhosis

Check out this video that explains psychosis created by our colleagues at HeadsUp PA, an organization focused on ending the stigma around mental health.


Even though symptoms of psychosis can sometimes feel hard to talk about, it’s important to seek help early. We know that the sooner you get the support you need, the sooner you can start feeling better and get back to the things that matter to you.  

Identify the signs and symptoms of psychosis